Theatre

The Lincoln Center Manual

Lincoln Center is one of the most iconic performing arts institutions in the world. From world-class opera productions to beautiful ballets to film analysis: no matter which art form you prefer, there’s a spot in Lincoln Center for you to find like-minded folk. But navigating this lovely complex can be daunting at first, so I’ve broken it down for you.

  1. Metropolitan Opera House

This luxurious arched building behind the great fountain plays host to many different operatic shows every year. Some 800,000 people attend more than 200 performances at the place every year. Blending gifted singers with visionary directors, the Met promises you quality artistry and a night to remember. And there are subtitle screens at every seat!

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  1. Vivian Beaumont Theatre

The only Broadway house in the complex is named for Vivian Beaumont, a philanthropic heiress who financially supported the completion of this theatre. It is a rather large venue; noteworthy shows that have played here in recent years include The Light in the Piazza, South Pacific, and The King and I.

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  1. Alice Tully Hall

Film and music buffs should find themselves at this hall, the building next to the Juilliard School. Since its opening in 1969, it’s played host to the annual New York Film Festival and also serves as the home for Lincoln Center’s Chamber Music Society. The Alice Tully Hall was renovated in 2009. Interestingly, there is an enormous pipe organ in the venue rivaling those often found in cathedrals.

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  1. David Geffen Hall

This concert stage has gone through a lot of names. It began life in 1962 as the Philharmonic Hall, became Avery Fisher Hall in 1973, and got its current name in 2015. The venue of choice for the NY Philharmonic, David Geffen Hall features a vast lobby and houses many beautiful sculptures within its walls.

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  1. David Koch Theatre

Formerly known as the New York State Theater, it was one of the first buildings to open at Lincoln Center. Although the default home of the New York City Ballet, it also serves the Royal Ballet and the annual Mostly Mozart Festival. Architecturally, it is known for its winding staircases and modern art displays as well as stud lights around the orchestra and an impressive chandelier.

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  1. David Rubenstein Atrium

This is a relatively quiet spot, one that’s a very popular gathering point and a great place to begin your LC journey. It is one of the newer buildings on the campus, existing only since 2009, but has quickly grown into a versatile space with free Wi-Fi, a café, and a 42-foot “media wall.”

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  1. Other Locations

Of course, these major parts of Lincoln Center are just the tip of the iceberg. Nestled in between are parks, studios, the lauded Library of the Performing Arts, and many more sites to whet your cultural appetite. If you do get lost, there’s no need to fret; you may very well discover something new and wonderful. And if worst comes to worst, just flag down a native and ask for some directions!

(Source: GoVisitNYC, as written by yours truly.)

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